Reflection: ‘Lost on Planet China,’ by J. Maarten Troost

In his first two books, Sex Lives of Cannibals and Getting Stoned with Savages, J. Maarten Troost wrote about his life living with his diplomat wife in the far reaches of the Equatorial Pacific. Strangely, these books earned Troost the moniker, "travel writer," despite the fact they are more memoir than guidebook to traveling through … Continue reading Reflection: ‘Lost on Planet China,’ by J. Maarten Troost

‘300’: How to Act Like a Hypermasculine Ancient Greek

(This essay considers the graphic novel and film version of 300 to be one and the same since the latter is a near frame-by-frame reproduction of the former.) To those who know little or nothing about ancient Greek society (read: pretty much everyone), Frank Miller's 300 seems like a senseless, gory hack-fest, a tale tailored … Continue reading ‘300’: How to Act Like a Hypermasculine Ancient Greek

Reflection: ‘The English Patient’ (1996)

Michael Ondaatje's novel, The English Patient, suggests that inter-cultural romantic relationships will ultimately not last due to too many inherent, subconscious differences. Anthony Minghella's 1996 film adaption strays away from this theme, however, and instead presents us with a narrative that straightforwardly demonstrates the devastating effects of war and politics upon the individuals involved in these institutions. … Continue reading Reflection: ‘The English Patient’ (1996)